Ban on paan, gutkha in UP offices - The Fearless Indian
Home / Videos / Ban on paan, gutkha in UP offices

Ban on paan, gutkha in UP offices

  • Mrinalini Singh
  • March 30, 2017
Follow us on

Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath banned chewing of ‘paan’, and consumption of tobacco and its products in all state government offices, hospitals and educational institutions. The CM also allocated portfolios to his ministerial colleagues, keeping several key departments like home, revenue, mining and jails with him.

Gutkha has been found responsible for increasing cases of oral cancer and many other diseases. This has led social activists to demand ban on gutkha. Governments both at Centre and states have been responding by giving mixed signals. The prohibitions have focused on the harmful effects of gutkha. There is no doubt that gutkha is harmful to health. No one can defend gutkha.

Prohibition on liquor was tried in USA in the first quarter of last century an in India in the second half of last century. Four decades back, smoking was fashionable, cool and the in-thing. Almost every movie showed the main lead male star smoking. Things have changed completely for the smokers. Films no longer show the hero with a cigarette on his lips.

A significantly large number of court officials, government employees are seen with a swollen lower lip, spitting and leaving dirty red marks in the corridors of power. Almost every government office bears such testimonial marks in the corridors and in every nook and corner. Is not ridiculous to imagine that such hopeless addicts will be able to prevent others from falling prey to the habit?

It needs no expert knowledge but good old common sense to realize that a slow and steady approach is likely to work much better than the impractical sledgehammer approach of total ban on manufacture and sale of gutkha.

Tobacco use in India has been a source of concern lately. A report on the economic burden of tobacco-related diseases in India, released by the Public Health Foundation of India (PHFI) in May 2014, estimated that India, spent Rs 1,04, 500 crore for managing tobacco-related diseases in 2011. Apart from that, tobacco products also led to a medical burden of Rs 16, 800 crore, indirect morbidity cost of Rs 14.700 and premature mortality cost of Rs 73,000 crores on the country during the same period.

Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath banned chewing of ‘paan’, and consumption of tobacco and its products in all state government offices, hospitals and educational institutions. The CM also allocated portfolios to his ministerial colleagues, keeping several key departments like home, revenue, mining and jails with him. Gutkha has been found responsible for increasing cases of oral cancer and many other diseases. This has led social activists to demand ban on gutkha. Governments both at Centre and states have been responding by giving mixed signals. The prohibitions have focused on the harmful effects of gutkha. There is no doubt that gutkha is harmful to health. No one can defend gutkha. Prohibition on liquor was tried in USA in the first quarter of last century an in India in the second half of last century. Four decades back, smoking was fashionable, cool and the in-thing. Almost every movie showed the main lead male star smoking. Things have changed completely for the smokers. Films no longer show the hero with a cigarette on his lips. A significantly large number of court officials, government employees are seen with a swollen lower lip, spitting and leaving dirty red marks in the corridors of power. Almost every government office bears such testimonial marks in the corridors and in every nook and corner. Is not ridiculous to imagine that such hopeless addicts will be able to prevent others from falling prey to the habit? It needs no expert knowledge but good old common sense to realize that a slow and steady approach is likely to work much better than the impractical sledgehammer approach of total ban on manufacture and sale of gutkha. Tobacco use in India has been a source of concern lately. A report on the economic burden of tobacco-related diseases in India, released by the Public Health Foundation of India (PHFI) in May 2014, estimated that India, spent Rs 1,04, 500 crore for managing tobacco-related diseases in 2011. Apart from that, tobacco products also led to a medical burden of Rs 16, 800 crore, indirect morbidity cost of Rs 14.700 and premature mortality cost of Rs 73,000 crores on the country during the same period.

Facebook Comments

You may also like

Check Also

Maruti Suzuki Service Fraud Caught on Camera

If there's one thing that unites all the car owners is probably the fact that neither of us are happy with the way our cars are serviced at the respective service...

Loading...